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Mission

The Harvard University South Asia Institute (SAI) engages faculty and students through interdisciplinary programs to advance and deepen the teaching and research on global issues relevant to South Asia. 

About SAI | View the South Asia Institute video

Upcoming Events


Wed, December 7, 2016 from 05:15pm - 06:45pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K050

A Conversation with Navtej Sarna, Indian Ambassador to the US

Special Event

Navtej Sarna, Indian Ambassador to the US

Chair: Tarun KhannaJorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, South Asia Institute

Ambassador Sarna took charge as Ambassador of India to the United States on November 5, 2016. He has been a Member of the Indian Foreign Service since 1980.

He was previously posted in London as High Commissioner, and before moving to London, Mr Sarna was Secretary (West) in the Ministry of External Affairs. Mr Sarna was among the longest-serving spokespersons of the ministry between 2002 and 2008. He has also had postings in Moscow, Warsaw, Tehran, Geneva and Thimphu. Mr Sarna is also a prolific author of many fiction and non-fiction books, recently ‘Second Thoughts: On Books, Authors and the Writerly Life’ that was released last year.

Reception to follow.

Please note: This event will be off the record (Chatham House Rules).

START
Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 05:15pm

END
Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 06:45pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K050

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

amb_2016_nov_9
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Wed, December 7, 2016 from 03:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS South

Weekly Tea Break

Harvard faculty, students, fellows, staff, and affiliates are invited to a weekly tea break at SAI’s office, 4th floor of 1730 Cambridge Street. Come enjoy tea and snacks and get to know SAI’s community.

SAI Visiting Artist Meenakshi Sengupta will lead an interactive art performance during the tea break.

START
Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

Nice_Cup_of_Tea
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Thu, December 8, 2016 from 12:00pm - 01:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Artist talk: Waking Whispers

Arts Seminar

Komal Shahid Khan, Visiting Artist, South Asia Institute Arts Program

Chair: Susan S. BeanChair, Art & Archaeology Center, American Institute of Indian Studies; Board Member, Textile Society of America; Associate, Peabody Museum, Harvard University; Senior Curator for South Asian and Korean Art. Peabody Essex Museum

Starting with an introduction and practices which lead to her specialization in Miniature painting, Khan will discuss how her work evolved over time, from traditional to conceptual and experimental. She will be talking about her Projects/ Series of Paintings, including: ‘Riddle, I call Life’ (2014), ‘Revelation’ (2015), ‘Aura’ (2015), ‘Her’ (2016), and ‘Imagined Immortals’ (2016).

She will show each painting briefly, commenting on individuals, society and the understanding of consciousness and unconsciousness and how her recent work is based upon what she calls “poetics of masquerade’’ in which the painted narratives are timeless and familiar.

Khan is a Visual Artist, based in Islamabad, Pakistan. She graduated from the University of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan in 2012 and then did her Master in Fine Arts from Fatima Jinnah Women University Rawalpindi, Pakistan with specialization in Miniature Painting. On completing the degree in 2014, she scored Distinction and was awarded Gold Medal for herb Thesis Show in 2014. Since graduating, she started her career with Group Shows in art galleries in Islamabad/Rawalpindi and then moved on to Lahore and Karachi as well. She is presently teaching at the National College of Arts Rawalpindi, Pakistan, as a Lecturer. October, 2016 marks her First Solo Exhibition entitled as “Imagined Immortals” in Karachi, Pakistan.

Lunch will be served.

The South Asia Institute Visiting Artist Program hosts emerging artists at Harvard to engage with faculty, students, and the Harvard community.

START
Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

1208 Komal
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Fri, December 9, 2016 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  MIT Lucian Pye Conference Room

Armed Politics: Violence, Order, and the State in Southern Asia

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Paul Staniland, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago

Paul Staniland is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Chicago, where he codirects the Program on International Security Policy. He is a cofounder of the Program on Political Violence. His research focuses on political violence, international security, and state formation, primarily in South and Southeast Asia. His book, Networks of Rebellion: Explaining Insurgent Cohesion and Collapse, was published by Cornell University Press in 2014. He is currently writing a book about armed politics and the state in southern Asia.

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

START
Fri, Dec 9, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Dec 9, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
MIT Lucian Pye Conference Room

ADDRESS
E40-495, 1 Amherst Street Cambridge, MA

Capture
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News


Student voices: Underground banking in Myanmar

Jasmine Chia, Harvard College ’18, started her summer in Myanmar intending to study Vipassana Buddhism, but became fascinated with a different topic: a banking phenomenon that explains the links between capitalist religion and political engagement.

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A change called NeHA

In an article for the Indian Express, Satchit Balsari and Tarun Khanna write that the proposed National e-Health Authority could launch a digital health revolution in India, but safeguards need to be in place to protect patients’ privacy. This is in follow up to the recently held Radcliffe Advanced Seminar, “Exchanging Health Information.”

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Election reflections: White with rage

In a column for the Indian Express, Ashutosh Varshney, Brown University, who studies ethnic conflict and peace, democracy, and political economy in India, argues that the Trump vote is not primarily born of globalization anxieties, but is rather the outcome of white nationalism.

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Student voices: Beef bans in India

Shaiba Rather, Harvard College ’17, spent her summer conducting research for her senior thesis on the bans of the production and consumption of beef in India. “This topic contributes to a larger question of how identity politics are mobilized in multicultural democracies,” she writes.

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Shafiqul Islam wins Water Prize

Islam is the director of the Boston Water Group, a diverse group of researchers and practitioners who but work around the world to address problems that involve water.

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Disease and politics: Lessons from Calcutta and Canton

At a recent meeting of the Brown/Harvard/MIT Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics on Oct. 14,
Prerna Singh, Brown University, compared the success of the smallpox vaccine in 19th century Calcutta and Canton to show that new medical technologies must be embedded in existing cultural norms to be effective.

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Alum Q+A: Lessons from Dadabhai Naoroji

Dinyar Patel, a Harvard alum who is now an Assistant Professor at the University of South Carolina, recently co-edited a volume of selected correspondences from the Dadabhai Naoroji Papers. “People like Naoroji were talking about a lot of similar issues to what politicians are talking about now in India,” Patel said in an interview with SAI.

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